Pittsburgh cultural activities    2009-07-22

 

During last week's business trip in Pittsburgh, I would be remiss in my cultural endeavors to make time for whatever cultural activities I could.    Here are 2 stops I missed on my last trip in 2006 to this city.    Again all I had was my phone camera so the pictures below are not the best.

 

As seen various travel and food shows, Primanti's is a locally famous name, and what now is a local chain started out as one small, informal-type restaurant in the city's Strip District, which was originally an industrial area to the northeast of downtown, now becoming somewhat trendy and gentrified.     The original restaurant is the one we visited and is the one usually shown on these travel shows, and features wax paper and your fingers as the table setting, and every sandwich piled high with cole slow and fries, right into the sandwich.

 

Here is a small summary ... http://www.seriouseats.com/2008/08/primanti-brothers-pittsburgh-cheesteak-pastrami-sandwiches.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Thursday nite the Carnegie Museum of Art and Natural History is open late.    I only had time to go through the art portion, which is mostly, but not totally, contemporary art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rodin's "The Thinker" in this exhibit is watching himself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am not clear how this ended up in Pittsburgh but this art deco mural was rescued from the SS Normandie, a French ocean liner that caught fire right on the pier in New York in 1942 (web photo below).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A typical contemporary gallery in the museum.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Several paintings were dedicated to the industrial and steel history of the Pittsburgh area.

 

 

 

 

An interesting temporary exhibit documented the history of photography from its origins in the 1840 to the present day.   Look at the web photo below which was an early daguerreotype from one of the Lincoln inauguarations in the 1860s.    Then looking at the second photo, photographer Jerry Spagnoli attempted to use the same 19th century daguerreotype techniques in this year's Obama inauguration.    The third photo is a much clearer photo I downloaded.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had a few minutes to quickly walk through the mineral and crystal gallery in the Natural History Museum.   This was spooky.

 

 

 




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